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Thread: Civil War in Libya

  1. #1
    To vex the world rather than divert it. Villerar's Avatar
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    Civil War in Libya

    This topic is for posting news about the conflict in Libya since the fall of Gaddhafi that became a war some months ago.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...rn-libya-derna

    It is a warm October evening in Derna, a small town on Libya’s north east coast, 450 miles from the capital, Tripoli.

    The main square is packed with young men, brought by a summons from the town’s self-proclaimed emir to swear allegiance to a newly formed Islamic caliphate.

    The emir, on a stage just visible through the jumping throng, calls for the crowd to repeat his calls to join the a caliphate, to listen and follow orders, and to acclaim that the Islamic State (Isis) is here to stay.
    Refugees are the ones to suffer most because of the war with winter coming.

    http://www.theguardian.com/global-de...ng-falls-short

    Hundreds of thousands of displaced people in Libya urgently need blankets, warm clothes and shelter as winter takes hold and fighting rages between the army, rebel militias and Islamist extremists, making relief efforts increasingly difficult.

    Aid agencies said women, children and the elderly are particularly vulnerable as a violent standoff between armed forces linked to two rival administrations pushes the oil-producing country deeper into civil war.

    The UN refugee agency, the UNHCR, said intense fighting in western, eastern and south-eastern Libya has forced more than 394,000 people from their homes. They are now scattered across 35 towns and cities, many of which are straining under the burden, with some schools being taken over to house the displaced.
    Will Libya become the most recent example of blowback?

  2. #2
    To vex the world rather than divert it. Villerar's Avatar
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    Re: Civil War in Libya

    Well, talk about a blast from the past. Anyway, to answer the above question, yes.

    It's clear from a recent interview cum feature cum personal essay by Jeffrey Goldberg, the doyen of American foreign policy journalism, that Obama mostly places fault with the members of the European coalition for intervention in Libya. It ignited some indecorous responses from some European politicians (both from the right and the left), and some artless dodging by Cameron.

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2...t-barack-obama

    David Cameron was distracted by domestic priorities as Libya descended into a “mess”, Barack Obama has suggested.

    In frank comments about foreign relations, the US president also revealed he warned his British counterpart that the “special relationship” would be at risk if the UK did not commit to spending 2% of its national income on defence, in line with Nato targets.

    The remarks were made in a lengthy interview with the Atlantic. Obama expressed aggravation with “free riders” among world leaders who call for international action if there is a war or other humanitarian crisis but do not commit enough military resources. “You have to pay your fair share,” he said.

    He made critical comments about both the UK and France for participating in military action in Libya in 2011 that removed its dictator, Muammar Gaddafi, but subsequently failing to stop it becoming a “mess”.

    Downing Street has refused to comment but MPs from Britain and France have hit back, criticising Obama’s lack of leadership in north Africa and the Middle East.
    I think there's merit to Obama's frustration, as there is no question that much of the actual hawkish pushing was by those two, but I note that the United States themselves have also not excelled at reconstruction after intervention. Also, the free riders accusation easily sounds rather smug to European ears when, from their perspective, most interventions they get involved in are for the sake of their American ally (I don't believe in the Pax Americana, by the way). In addition, it is unlikely that his rather active drone policy did much good either.

  3. #3
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    Re: Civil War in Libya

    Read this article about Sarkozy's corruption trial and see whether you can see the Libya invasion in the same light.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...orruption-case

    Nicolas Sarkozy’s hopes of running for president again next year have been dealt a blow by a court ruling that paves the way for him to stand trial for corruption and influence peddling. The former French leader had hoped that wire-tapped tapes of private conversations with his lawyer would be ruled illegal and inadmissible in court, leading to the case being thrown out.

    But on Tuesday France’s highest court, the cour de cassation, ruled that investigators broke no law by using the phone taps, clearing the final obstacle for prosecutors hoping to bring Sarkozy to trial.

    The decision is the latest in a series of legal problems besetting the ex-president, now leader of the opposition centre-right Les Républicains party. In a separate case, he was put under formal investigation in February over suspected irregularities in the funding of his 2012 presidential campaign, which he lost to the socialist François Hollande. The case is ongoing, but Sarkozy denies all wrongdoing.

  4. #4
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    Re: Civil War in Libya

    You may have heard noise of a new unity government in Libya, though there are still disagreements among the Tripoli group.

    https://theconversation.com/five-yea...tability-57534

    After five years of violence and political instability, Libya may be on the verge of forming a stable government, after the self-declared administration in Tripoli stepped down in favour of the UN-backed unity government. But the violent political conflicts that have wracked the country since 2011 are far from resolved.

    It wasn’t meant to be this way. Many Libyans were optimistic about the future of their country after the elections of July 2012. An autocratic leader had been overthrown and there were high hopes that the coming period would be one of democracy and freedom.

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