PDA

View Full Version : So; your favorite artist?



Koop
July 21st, 2010, 12:16 PM
To all the artist peeps up in hurrre

Who are your favorite artists?
Are they anime/manga related? traditonial? digital?
who are they.

Do they inspire your artwork at all?

my absolute favorite is Gustav Klimt
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_MCtLCn7Agqg/S8EfhomVdjI/AAAAAAAABNU/YNcN8lRyyzo/s1600/Gustav-Klimt-Lady-with-fan.jpg
His work always seems to bleed into mine.

Villerar
July 21st, 2010, 12:43 PM
Ah, Gustav Klimt. Actually, that work is more realistic than I would expect of him.

The motif is familiar, though, especially the yellow.

I'm not sure whether I have a favourite artist... Uuuuuuuuuuugh... I really can't think of anybody of whom I have seen enough to judge, I'm not a very artsy person.

Curus
July 21st, 2010, 12:45 PM
Klimt is cool, we have his pix up all over the place.

Hmm...now I shall have to internally debate the pretentious/nerdy ratio I should employ here...

Villerar
July 21st, 2010, 01:49 PM
Why are you so stylish, TIS?

Anyway, I think Lowry is a pretty cool guy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._S._Lowry
http://www.google.nl/images?um=1&hl=nl&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=l+s+lowry&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

Curus
July 21st, 2010, 02:11 PM
Why are you so stylish, TIS?

Because I'm a cool ki-NO! No! I'm sick of that answer!

It's because I'm gonna taste great. ...Yeah, that'll work for now.

SuperMaria
July 21st, 2010, 02:55 PM
Actually I think my favourite artist/piece of art was a yr11 (sixth form?) art student's bit of work. I can't even remember his whole name, but his last name was Morgans. The artwork he did for his final assesment thing just leapt out and inspired me. I think we must have similar minds or something because when I looked in his sketchbook, the ideas pages with pictures from the internet etc were all of manga/anime/RPG things. But anyway, this artwork he did...hard to explain in words. Wish I had had a camera.

But if we're talking proper artists then...hmm...I'm not much of a looking-at-art person. I can critique it by using fancy words and impressing teachers but I'm not much of a gallery person, as I said.

Gazoinks
July 21st, 2010, 03:03 PM
Although I'm not particularly versed in visual arts (I'm more of a writer) I really like David Hellman's art. He did the art for Braid and the webcomic a Lesson Is Learned But The Damage Is Irreversible. In the webcomic, he changes styles a lot, from painterly to black and white to clear comic-book style. Here's his site. (http://www.davidhellman.net/)

Spastic Hedgehog
July 22nd, 2010, 09:24 AM
Personally I'm going to go all cliche here and say Leonardo Da Vinci. You can tell I'm a fan not only of his works, but of him as a person when I correct people when they just call him "Da Vinci". That just means he came from Vinci.

That's like calling you "Da [Insert Subject Hometown Here]".

And you would say, "Umm... totally not my name. You know how many people live here?"
"How do you think Leo feels??"

But yeah, I actually like John the Baptist more than say, the Mona Lisa or The Last Supper. And no, I do not believe in the 'Da Vinci Code' because it's a fictional story and the title is grammatically incorrect. :P

But I don't see much of his art being an influence on mine, just because my style of art just kind of sucks. lol. But I love his quotes and his way of thinking.

Curus
July 22nd, 2010, 10:47 AM
Ah, that may be the surname's original meaning, but it is being used quite clearly as Leonardo's surname and therefore is distinct from the ordinary meaning. After all, one surnamed Smith can be called such, even if they are not a smith.

Spastic Hedgehog
July 22nd, 2010, 10:57 AM
Ah, that may be the surname's original meaning, but it is being used quite clearly as Leonardo's surname and therefore is distinct from the ordinary meaning. After all, one surnamed Smith can be called such, even if they are not a smith.

Yes, but this was in the time before Surnames.
Actually I think Napoleon made surnames mandatory...
You identified people from where they came from, not what just their name was, like Leo or like Jesus of Nazareth. "Of Nazareth" isn't a last name, it's where he was from.

Curus
July 22nd, 2010, 11:02 AM
Well of course; people were differentiated by location or occupation; like my Smith example. Now these have been standardised into surnames, the problem has gone. Kekeke...

Spastic Hedgehog
July 22nd, 2010, 11:09 AM
Alright, I do concede that is correct, but it still erks me when they call Leonardo simply 'Da Vinci'.

Villerar
July 22nd, 2010, 01:34 PM
May I enquire whether it is quaint that the famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci of the proportions of a man always reminds me of Hermeticism and rhw notion of the microcosmos?

Also, is it bad that I caught myself on the following thought process?

*sees purple text*
*thinks "hai Hypes"*
*reads post thinking Hypes is the author*
*sees the author is also the latest poster, who was not Hypes*
*realises mistake*

Curus
July 22nd, 2010, 04:30 PM
Also, is it bad that I caught myself on the following thought process?

*sees purple text*
*thinks "hai Hypes"*
*reads post thinking Hypes is the author*
*sees the author is also the latest poster, who was not Hypes*
*realises mistake*

Remember - identify them by avatars instead.

Though this does have the downside of causing one to treat avatars much like a large, detailed smiley.

Koop
July 24th, 2010, 10:46 AM
Those super physical apperance was the niche of the Renassiance's art period. So if the MicroCosmos notions studies began in the same era; it'd of probably been portrtayed as such as well.

Villerar
July 24th, 2010, 02:04 PM
Hermeticism indeed became big during the Renaissance, but I thought Leonardo da Vinci would have been a bit early, I thought Hermeticism was really big in the sixteenth century. Of course the Renaissance started in Italy in the fourteenth century, but I am a bit unsure whether the writing of Hermes Trismegistus were already rediscovered. According to Wikipedia they already were in 1460, so maybe it's a possible link, but I'm not sure how important it was in Leonardo's work in general.

Though his art and engineering was very marvellous, I think his science and his thoughts are a good deal overrated by popular culture, if you look at the bigger context. He published very little (if anything) scientific and such wild and by logical positivist norms progressive thinking was not really new after new philosophies gained ground aside Aristotelianism. Yes, he was a real Renaissance man and to a degree also an autodidact which is very impressive, but popular culture has made him into an anachronistic superhero.

slashty
July 25th, 2010, 10:34 PM
Ray Hargreaves.
Sorry...
Anyway, I do enjoy the works of Escher, probably because they make me think. You can probably tell I like thinking. Also, lol @ Villerar thinking the post was Hypes, I did the same thing.