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Thread: Welcome to Cryptology 101

  1. #1
    Deranged Madman, Obsessive Historian Kiptoke's Avatar
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    Welcome to Cryptology 101

    Hello, I am Kiptoke.

    I am well known for the AHCYOA, and for just being strange around the fourms.

    I thought I'd might an little educational piece about one of my favorite hobbies.

    Cryptology: What Is It?

    Essentially, cryptology is the study of codes and ciphers. This essentially means the study of the history, forming, and breaking of codes and ciphers.

    Some famous examples might be the Caesar Cipher (WKH TXLFN EURZQ IRA MXPSV RYHU WKH ODCB GRJ) and the Enigma (O'N OQINYB XRI TGK WLDX IS XIWIWB YYEY EGMWCTL).

    Don't worry if these seem strange, they will become readable the further we go through these lessons. (except for Enigma. If you can decode that, I'd be amazed)

    What Do I Plan To Do?

    Just upload a few lessons about cryptology, give a short example of a cipher, explain it's history, and give an example.

    Note: It's mostly about the example.

    So, let's get started!

    The Caesar Cipher


    Introduction: The Caesar cipher is one of the earliest known and simplest ciphers. It is named after Julius Caesar, who used it to speak to his generals.

    It is a type of substitution cipher in which each letter in the plaintext is 'shifted' a certain number of places down the alphabet. A subsitution cipher is a cipher where all of the letters are replaced with another. For example, with a shift of 1, A would be replaced by B, B would become C, and so on. The encryption step performed by a Caesar cipher is often incorporated as part of more complex schemes, such as the Vigenère cipher (we'll cover this later)

    Example: The transformation can be represented by aligning two alphabets; the cipher alphabet is the plain alphabet rotated left or right by some number of positions.

    For example, if I move the second alphabet up three positions, I would get this:

    Code:
    Plain:    ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
    Cipher:   DEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABC
    Thus, a message such as:

    Code:
    defend the east wall of the castle
    Ends up as:

    Code:
    efgfoe uif fbtu xbmm pg uif dbtumf
    Try It Yourself:

    So, knowing what you've learned, I present you with an example of the Caesar Cipher, for you to try and break. If you need help, just put down a message in the thread.

    Code:
    P ugxtcsan sthtgi rdbbjcxin lwtgt iwt hjc xh wdi, iwt bddc xh qtpjixuja, pcs bnhitgxdjh axvwih ephh dktgwtps lwxat lt paa egtitcs id hatte. Ltardbt id Cxvwi Kpat.
    Extra points to tell me which source the quote comes from. (Except for you, Asphoxia.)

  2. #2
    The only RPer who RPs shopping in the glitz pit Captain Panda's Avatar
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    Re: Welcome to Cryptology 101

    So, I'm guessing you've read the code book? It's a pretty neat little book all about cryptography, I had to read it as part of number theory because some of the more advanced cryptograms end up needing some ridiculously huge prime numbers to the modulo of another thing. I would recommend it to those interested in the topic.

    Also hi.
    Spoiler: Quotes 

  3. #3
    We're all lurkers here SSBBrawler's Avatar
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    Re: Welcome to Cryptology 101

    Spoiler: Can't handle my steganography! 

  4. #4
    Deranged Madman, Obsessive Historian Kiptoke's Avatar
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    Re: Welcome to Cryptology 101

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Panda View Post
    So, I'm guessing you've read the code book? It's a pretty neat little book all about cryptography, I had to read it as part of number theory because some of the more advanced cryptograms end up needing some ridiculously huge prime numbers to the modulo of another thing. I would recommend it to those interested in the topic.

    Also hi.
    Actually, yes. The Code Book by Simon Singh, I'm assuming?

    I read this for a cryptology summer class, and it's what began my intrest into the topic.

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